The Clone Stamp Made Easy
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The Clone Stamp Made Easy

The steps and procedures here will help you learn how to use the Clone Stamp Tool. This is an awesome tool and you should practice the use of it before you try to use as a pro would. I love photography and editing images and if you love it as much as I then you will use this trick of the trade when you want your image to be the best.

Using the cloning stamp is a tool that should be used after you have done a lot of practicing.  After all, it is a tool that either makes the image better, or makes you look like you do not know what you are doing.  Which of those two outcomes do you think is better for your professionalism or expertise?

There are many aspects you can use with this tool.  You can retouch an image, remove significant features and heal minor blemishes.  It truly is a remarkable tool.  I want to go over some of my favorite uses with this tool in this article, and I think you will benefit if you don’t already know the wonders of this tool.

One of the things I hate the most about an awesome image is some significant distraction.  A person walking through an image and is slightly blurred is a big problem with what would typically be a great shot.  Let’s walk through some of my favorite steps to get rid of this distraction.

Open your image in Photoshop and create a blank layer.  Select the Clone Stamp (S) and set the Soft-edged Brush to about 125 pixels in size.  Now enable the Aligned and All Layers options.  Alt+Click to sample an area, so that can it be used to remove the distraction in the image.  (You need to sample from an area that looks like it would be in the area you want to change.  If your distraction is on a bridge be sure to sample an area that has railing.  If the distraction is a person walking down a deserted street you need to use an area that looks like the area the subject is walking in).

Now, zoom in and engage the caps lock.  Position the brush at the point the sample area and the subject area match.  This needs to be as close as match as possible and using the caps lock will put a crosshairs in the circle so that you can be precise in measurement. 

Now you can begin to paint over the subject area with the area that you are sampling from.  The key is to match as much as you can in the image.  If the subject is a person walking along a brick wall on a sidewalk you need to ensure that the background stays looking like it hasn’t been altered.  Straight lines and the same look and consistency is key here.

One of the things you may notice is objects in the image may be repeated if you aren’t careful with the sampling area.  But this is also easy to take care of; you just have to do the same thing.  Choose a sample area, borrow from that area and clean up the image in the same manner.

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